Skip to main content

810-231-5800

Map

Our Location

10105 Veterans Memorial Drive, Suite 100
Hamburg Twp, MI 48189

livingston.office.front_.rs_.final_.png
livingston.frame_.wall_.2.rs_.png
livingston.kids_.wall_.rs_.png
livingston.withpatient.rs_.png
livingston.viewingarea.rs_.png
livinston.frame_wall.rs_.png
Home » What's New » Patches: How Lazy Eyes Get Active

Patches: How Lazy Eyes Get Active

Amblyopia, which is also called lazy eye, is frequently seen in children. It comes about when vision in one eye is stifled. This may occur if someone struggles to see well through one eye because of nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism. In most cases, an eye patch is the central and most productive part of remedying a lazy eye. We generally tell our patients to have their patch on for a couple of hours daily, and patients will often also need corrective glasses. Patching.

Many moms and dads have trouble fitting their kids with eye patches, especially when they’re preschool-aged. Their stronger eye is covered with the patch, which makes it harder for your child to see. It may be challenging to explain the process to your young child; that they must wear the patch to help the eyesight in their weaker eye, but can’t happen successfully unless their better eye is covered, thus restricting their sight. But fear not: there are quite a few tricks to help your son or daughter keep their patch on. Implementing a reward chart with stickers given when the patch is worn can be great for some kids. There are a variety of adhesive patches available in many colors and patterns. Take advantage of all the options and make it an activity by allowing them to select their patch each day. Kids who are a little older can usually comprehend the process, so it’s productive to sit and talk to them about it.

Another trick some parents find helpful is also placing an eye patch on their child’s favorite doll or stuffed animal. For very young children, you can use flotation wings to stop them from reaching their eyes to remove the patch.

Patches are a great solution to lazy eyes and can be very effective, but it really requires your child’s help and your ability to remain focused on the long-term goal of improving your child’s vision.