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Home » What's New » A Guide to Handling Common Eye Injuries

A Guide to Handling Common Eye Injuries


Eye injuries come in many shapes and sizes, with varying degrees of severity. Some may necessitate emergency action and immediate care by an optician, while others can be dealt with at home. Follow these guidelines for routine eye injuries, to determine the next move in case of an eye emergency. Don't forget that common sense preventive measures including using safety goggles or glasses may be the smartest way to keep your eyes safe.


A corneal abrasion (scratched eye) is not something to mess around with. It can lead to serious damage in a short amount of time and possibly result in blindness. Scratches are often the result of a poke in the eye, or scratching the eye when there is a particle of dust or sand in it. Since a scratch can open your eye to bacterial infection it's critical to visit your optometrist or an emergency room. The best care for a corneal abrasion is to cover it loosely and to visit your optometrist as soon as possible to check it out. Rubbing the eye will only make it worse and fully covering the eye can give bacteria a place to grow.


A chemical burn is another serious type of eye injury. It is often scary to get splashed in the eye by a potentially hazardous liquid. It's important to know what chemical went into your eye. A chemical's fundamental makeup can make a huge difference. Although acids can cause substantial swelling and pain, they can be washed out fairly easily. However, alkali chemicals that are bases can be much more serious even though they don't seem so since they don't cause as much initial eye pain or redness as acids.


While no one ever wants to anticipate an eye injury, it's always good to be prepared with what to do in potentially hazardous situations. By being prepared you can feel confident that you'll know how to handle most common eye problems. Don't forget, extra safety protections can help prevent these injuries from the get go so speak to your optometrist about preventative eye care options!